What prevented the British, in the instance you’ve chosen, from maintaining the distance from their Indian subjects that their ideologies demanded?

QUESTIONThomas Metcalf argues that after the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857, thecharacter and direction of British rule in India fundamentally changed.Rather than stressing the ways in which India might be reformed and remadeto eventually resemble Britain, the British began to emphasizeinsurmountable differences between themselves and their Indian subjects.The problem is that in living ever more closely with the peoples of India,the British encountered serious difficulties in maintaining that difference. AsMetcalf puts it,“… as they constructed their ‘India’, the British had always to negotiatethis disjuncture: between an acknowledgement of similarity, and aninsistence upon difference.” (Chapter 3, “The Creation of Difference, p.66)Please analyze closely at least ONE (1) concrete instance of a Britisheffort to assert a fundamental difference between themselves and theirIndian subjects after 1857. Notions of history, race, and gender played animportant role in this assertion of difference—one of these might be a goodplace to start.Then, following Metcalf’s thesis, please consider how this assertion ofdifference was fragile or threatened by actual realities on the ground inIndia. What prevented the British, in the instance you’ve chosen, frommaintaining the distance from their Indian subjects that their ideologiesdemanded?