Textual analysis and comparison

In class, you have read Brooke Jarviss The Insect Apocalypse is Here and Elizabeth Kolberts How to Write about a Vanishing World, and we have discussed both essays.
This essay requires a deep textual analysis of both essays not just the content but the structures of them.  We are going to contrast methods used in both essays.
There are three parts to this essay: Part 1 asks for analysis about Kolberts essay, Part 2 asks about analysis of Jarviss essay, and Part 3 asks for some comparison of the two essays. NOTE: I ask a lot of questions in this prompt, mostly because I want to hear your answers
PART 1:  Start with an Introduction.  Answer the question: Why should we care about this topic? Why should we listen to you, the writer, who is writing about these two essays? Write me a paragraph answering the question of why we are having this conversation.
Then, analysis of Kolberts writing:
Why does Elizabeth Kolbert start her essay talking about Herpetologist Marty Crump searching for a golden toad in Costa Rica? Why would she start with such a trivial story?
Give me a Summary of pages 126-7; in particular, what is Kolbert saying about polar ice caps? Remember, Your So What? text defines Summary as: “To capture the whole text in a smaller amount of space,” and “To identify the most important parts of a larger text.” 
Name all the animals and environments Kolbert directly discusses.
On p. 128, the biologists cry. Why do they cry? Give me a few sentences on this question.  HINT: extinction in real time is probably related to this; Kolbert discusses this term. 
What does hopefulness look like in this essay, as Kolbert describes it? What does hopelessness look like in this essay, as Kolbert describes it?
PART 2:   Jarvis begins her essay with a Sune Boye Riis riding his bike and noticing he wasnt eating any bugs (150).  Why does Jarvis begin her essay with such a trivial story?
Jarvis uses the words Armageddon, apocalypse and sixth extinction in her essay.   Look up the definitions of these three words and tell me the definitions.  Use some form of Dictionary
Jarvis defines functional extinction and numerical extinction.  What does she say? What is the difference?
Summarize p. 162 of Jarviss essay.  Remember, your So What? text defines Summary as: “To capture the whole text in a smaller amount of space,” and “To identify the most important parts of a larger text.” 
Describe the extinct animal you chose in the homework of a few weeks ago.  What impact does this animals extinction have on the world, either practically or in the bigger picture of the health of the earth?
PART 3:  FINALLY, JUST A FEW MORE TASKS:  What is the call to action in Jarviss essay? What exactly does she want our world to do? HERES THE IMPORTANT PART ABOUT THIS QUESTION:  Jarvis spells out some actions, but some may not be expressed.  Definitely state the expressed actions you notice in the essay, but if you believe there are some unexpressed actions that need to be taken, state them.
Then, answer the same question for the Kolbert essay:  What is the call to action in Kolberts essay? What exactly does she want our world to do? Kolbert also probably has some unexpressed calls to action in her essay; she wants you to continue thinking on your own.  If you note unstated calls to action, tell them to me.
BONUS MEAN PROFESSOR QUESTION:  Jarvis writes in her essay about a scientist who put a bug in his mouth because he was already carrying too much.  Who was that scientist? Look for it in the essay.
GENERAL NOTES ON THE WRITING:
Make sure to introduce both essays in your Introduction paragraph. I need the titles and the authors.
You dont need a Works Cited page but cite in your essay where found any definitions you looked up, even if just Dictionary.com.
Remember not to refer to the authors by their first names, only their last names.
REQUIREMENTS:  6-7 pages; Times New Roman, double spaced: MLA format (1 inch margins, and no title page)
I will give you online feedback on the rough draft.
Rough Draft due: 10/23, midnight (this is a change from the syllabus)
Final Draft due:  11/6, midnight (this is a change from the syllabus)