Stand point essay

Come to understand the main ideas of feminist standpoint theory 
Write a reflection of your personal background through an intersectional analysis 
Describe how you understand your identity through your experiences
Analyze how your background has shaped your concept of identity, including race, gender, class, and sexuality, following an intersectional framework [See supplemental materials: Power Flower] 
Work to critically examine your standpoint in relation to systems of power, and to identify possible ways in which your social location shapes your ways of knowing, being, and moving through the world 

Essays should be be at least 3 full pages in length, double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman font, 1-inch margins, in MLA format— see https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_overview_and_workshop.html 

—Essays should refer to and/or quote, with appropriate citational format, 2 readings from our course materials 

please quote from the book “I’m a wild seed”  and uploaed file.

What does “Standpoint” refer to? 

“Standpoint” refers to the social location that shapes how we know or understand the world. A critical approach to standpoint provides a complex picture of not only what our experiences are and where we “stand” in the world—and what our perspective is from that vantage point— but how that relates to other positions of being and knowing within structures of power in a society. 

One way of thinking about this, through the lens of feminist standpoint theory, is that we are experts of our own lives, and conversely, that we are not experts on the lives of others. Kimberlé Crenshaw’s concept of intersectionality helps us understand this further. To give a concrete example: while white or other non-Black women have privileged access to the perspective of women, they do not have the experience of being Black, and therefore do not have privileged access to the perspective of Black women.

What impact do you think this might have on the way we move through the world, as individuals and in community? How does this standpoint shape our experience of the world? Why would it be important to understand this? What can we do with this knowledge?