Research Terminology – Hire Academic Expert

Research Terminology: Definitions and Distinctions As you begin your research process, you will come across new terms and concepts that seem unique to research—in fact, they may seem like another language. When learning a new language, reference materials, such as a dictionary or grammar book, are always important to have close at hand. The Walden Library provides a helpful reference tool called The SAGE Encyclopedia of Social Science Research Methods to guide you through the language acquisition of research terminology and concepts. (While encyclopedias are useful in certain instances such as this, it is important to remember that citing them in your coursework, KAMs, dissertations, or thesis is not appropriate.) In this Discussion, you will use this resource, along with your text and video segments, to work with the philosophies of science and research approaches. To prepare for this Discussion: Review the following terms in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Social Science Research Methods: paradigm, epistemology, and ontology. Review Creswell's definitions of worldview, paradigms, epistemologies, and ontologies on page 6 of the course text, Research Design. Review the definitions that Dr. Patton offers for epistemology and ontology in the “Research Design” media segment. Review the definition of philosophy of science in the Learning Resources. Review Chapters 1 and 2 in the course text, A Primer in Theory Construction. Be attentive to the development of a scientific body of knowledge and paradigms. Determine how you would define these terms: philosophy of science, paradigm, epistemology, ontology. Note that defining philosophy of science is different from asking you about your personal philosophy of your discipline, such as your philosophy of education, or your philosophy of management. Consider the difference between these terms. Why is it important for a researcher to be familiar with these terms? With these thoughts in mind: Post by Day 3 the following in 2–3 paragraphs: Your definitions of the following terms: philosophy of science, paradigm, epistemology, and ontology Note that defining philosophy of science is different from asking you about your personal philosophy of your discipline, such as your philosophy of education, or your philosophy of management. The distinction between and among these terms An explanation of why these terms are important for researchers to know Be sure to support your postings and responses with specific references to the reading(s) and/or media segment(s) and use APA format. Creswell, J. (2009). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (Laureate Education, Inc., custom ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Chapter 1, “The Selection of a Research Design” This chapter presents the preliminary considerations for selecting a research design and will be used in the Discussions. Course Text: Reynolds, P. D. (2007). A primer in theory construction. Boston, MA: Pearson Education. Chapter 1, “Introduction” Chapter 2, “The Idea” The first chapter explains the importance of scientific knowledge and how that body of knowledge grows. The second chapter focuses on the concept of paradigms. The SAGE Encyclopedia of Social Science Research Methods Retrieved from the Walden Library databases. For Discussions 1 and 2, you will look up the following terms in the Sage Encyclopedia of Social Science Research Methods. (Important Notes: Remember that citing encyclopedias in your research papers and dissertations is not appropriate. Reference entries that appear at the bottom of each page on the site are not in APA style.) Constructivism Critical Theory Empiricism Epistemology Interpretivism Ontology Paradigm Positivism Web Site: Positivism and Post-Positivism http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/positvsm.htm This web site provides an extended explanation of two main philosophies in science. Definition of Philosophy of Science from Britannica Concise Encyclopedia available athttp://www.answers.com/topic/philosophy-of-science