Gender, work, and globalization Media focus:

Gender, work, and globalization Media focus: hypermobile capi­tal, people  Third World women not discussed “Feminization of migration” (Ehrenreich and Hochschild 2003); women in roles of nannies, maids, and sex workers in hidden economies Order similar from  Gender, work, and globalization Globalization impacts everyday lives Global cities the primary sites where the leading, global information industries are located (New York, Tokyo, etc.) Rather than nation-states functioning as the principal players in the global economy, global cities have become the primary “production sites for the leading information industries of our time” (Sassen, 2005, p. 109).  Domestic help and low-wage support workers are part of the infrastructure allowing highly paid professionals to work Order similar from  Gender, work, and globalization Globalization impacts everyday lives “Lived time” (Sassen, 2014) is how individuals experience time in the global economy as closely connected to class position Business professionals who travel the world experience a “temporal architecture,” which make travel bearable An entire infrastructure is maintained by classes of people (taxi drivers, hotel workers, etc.) whose lived time is quite different Two dynamics at work: Globalization has created a demand for low-wage workers  There is a “feminization of survival” in which women migrate because of conditions in their home countries  Order similar from