Awareness Identify your own beliefs and culture before caring for others. Minimize and

Awareness Identify your own beliefs and culture before caring for others. Minimize and control your personal biases that may interfere with the holistic relationship with your patient. Try to understand and become self-aware of your misconceptions and assumptions about your patients values. Acceptance This practice falls onto the theory from Margaret Newman called Health as Expanding Consciousness. Through the nurses presence and acceptance of themselves, the patient becomes empowered during times of duress or chaos to make lasting changes that promote hope, well-being, and health that is not present on the actual disease. Healing and helping our patients heal, has powerful implications that go beyond the medical model. Asking When you initiate care during your initial health assessment, ask if there are any cultural or religious practices or beliefs, you need to know about to respect and support their needs. If they are unsure or unaware of their unique needs in the healthcare setting, reassure them that you are willing to adjust your care based on their values if they do become aware of any issues. Encourage them to communicate those needs to you as they happen to arise during the assessment. Now that we have explored these practices answer the question to the discussion board. Reflecting on your own culture, how might your culture impact you as a nurse? Based on the practices above, have you ever encountered a situation where someone was not aware, accepting, or did not ask about your culture? If the experience is too painful, discuss instead of a scenario where you witnessed this instead.

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